flooding

The flooding currently affecting the United Kingdom has, in parts, changed the landscape of our island forever.  Some areas, notably the Somerset Levels should in time return to a state of normality depending on the efficiency of the Environment Agency’s sixty five pumps removing over a million tonnes of flood water.  Whether normality will be […]

How we talk about food is changing. The language of food now centres around locality, seasonal, organic, fresh and many more buzzwords aside. I visit one retailer to see how they’re having to respond to changing consumer requirements and ask if we as consumers really know what we’re talking about. Is it possible for the […]

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I can’t lie, this stuff freaks me out. For two reasons. Firstly: have you seen that face? It’s the thing of childhood nightmares! An image rapidly etched onto your retinas, there is no escape from the horror. Not even when you close your eyes… Secondly it causes me a degree of concern. Let me explain. […]

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Tomatoes are a member of the nightshade family and thus related to aubergines, peppers and chillies. Originally from South America they were first recorded as being eaten in the United Kingdom in the 1590s. Technically tomatoes are actually berries and therefore fruit, however for culinary purposes we have become accustomed to thinking of them as […]

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I found myself walking along the Northumbrian Coast over the weekend. Starting at Craster, near-ish to Alnwick up to the Ship Inn at Low Newton, a beautiful tiny pub that was featured by James May and Oz Clarke on the BBC. Craster is a small fishing village with a couple of shops, private harbour and […]

As an ex sheep farmer I have a slight soft spot for lamb. Not much of a surprise there! Through supplying restaurants and private individuals over the past couple of years a very clear trend started to emerge: restaurants LOVE shoulder, belly and neck. Households? Not so much, give them a leg of lamb any […]

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There are enough in the United Kingdom for every 2.73 people to have one. Lined up nose to tail (easier said than done), in total they would stretch along England’s coastline 3.8 times. Of course, I’m referring to sheep!   The United Kingdom was home to 23 million of the little woolly blobs between December […]